Wednesday, December 19, 2007

Joseph








More thoughts on Advent IV and Joseph. Here are 2 poems of Joseph from RevGalBlogPals.

I'm a carpenter.
I make things fit. I square off the edges.
I follow the pumb line.
I measure twice before I cut once.
Surprises are not the friend of a builder.
I like to know the plan.
I like to see the plan before I begin.
But this time I'm not the builder, am I?
This time I'm a tool.
A hammer in your grip.
A nail between your fingers.
I am a chisel is your hands.
This project is yours, not mine....

by Max Lucado in He Still Moves Stones


And by J. Barrie Shepherd, Faces at the Manger
“The hardest task
The most difficult role of all
That of just being there
And Joseph, dearest Joseph, stands for that.
Don’t you see?

It is important,
crucially important,
that he stand there by that manger,
as he does,
In all his silent misery
Of doubt concern and fear.
If Joseph were not there
There might be no place for us,
For those of us at least-
So many- who recognize and know-
That heartache, for our own,
Who share that helpless sense
Of lostness, of impotence
In our own lives, our families, our jobs
In our fearful threatened world this night.
Yes, in Joseph’s look of anguish
We find our place;
We discover that we too
Belong beside the manger:
This manger in which are met
God’s peace and all our wars and fears....
Let us be there,
Simply be there just as Joseph was,
With nothing we can do now,
Nothing we can bring-
It’s far too late for that-
Nothing even to be said
Except, ‘Behold- be blessed,
Be silent, be at peace.’

Joseph, son of David,
‘Do not fear,’ the angel said.
And Jim and Alice, Fred and Sue,
Bob and Tom and Jean and Betty too,
The word to you, to all of us
Here at the manger side,
The word is also, ‘do not fear.’
Our God, the Lord and Sovereign,
Maker of heaven and earth,
Time and eternity,
Of life and death and all that is
And shall be,Has joined us in this moment…,”


And the hymn Joseph Dearest

4 comments:

Grandmère Mimi said...

Ann, those are the sweetest nativity figures. I love them. Where did they come from?

I like the poems, too.

Ann said...

They were made by Barbara Hughes of Sewanee TN - they are about 4 inches tall. I will take some more photos and post them.

Anonymous said...

Oh, yes, please do. In our parish children's worship time I've been introducing some Godly Play and Catechesis of the Good Shepherd lessons on the Holy Family. I found a plaster-of-Paris nativity set in the Sunday school office, and I've been using that, but I suffer from Atrium envy when I see the beautiful, simple olivewood figures in catalogues and online. What I love about these figures is that they are simple, but the faces look real. Joseph looks overjoyed in spite of himself. And Jesus looks like an actual baby.

Boas festas!

Mary

Keyanna said...

Well written article.