Friday, December 08, 2006


Thinking about Sunday and preaching. For readings click here.
Chewing on this bits - hoping they will coalesce into a sermon.
From the Process and Faith website. "The function of Advent is to focus on this aspect of life, the always-to-be-expected coming of Christ into our experience, and the specific contribution of repentance-texts is encourage reflection upon all the ways in which our lives do not in fact manifest the love and devotion that are appropriate to relationships with God and our neighbors."
From Harry Mozolak
_gift among gifts_
Harvey S. Mozolak

time is not the treasure
but the wrapping for the gift
God at Bethlehem

we too come
from later years
crowned by aureate achievements
drawn from distant cathedrals
mitered by incensed right and ritual
from other epochs
turbaned by tempting technologies

to make homage
join the journey
of ageless adoration
to the timeless God
born today a child

So far I am thinking about the birth and re-birth of hope -- Jesus is born in his day and in our day and in all the days of creation from the beginning to the end. John speaks of preparing the way, Malachi speaks of refiner's fire. Who can read the words of Malachi "But who can endure the day of his coming, and who can stand when he appears?" and not hear Handel's Messiah becoming an ear worm that will stay with one all day until sleep?
Who can stand? and yet the promise is that Christ makes us "worthy to stand" (BCP Eucharistic Prayer and St. Paul). The hope we have is that no matter what life brings we will be able to stand - maybe needing a lot of help or maybe only in our minds - but stand in the fullness of our creation. We will see the salvation of God not in some far distant future but wherever Christ appears - wherever 2 or 3 are gathered in his name or serving as his hands in the world or being served by others.

2 comments:

Ann said...

posting response to my own blog - is that like talking to myself? A comment from another sermon discussion list about refiner's fire:
someone had actually gone to a fellow who refined and worked with silver and asked about the process of refining. He was told by the refiner that one had to be careful to keep the metal in the fire long enough to get rid of the impurities, but not too long. Asked how he would know it was long enough he said, "I know the impurities are gone when I can see my reflection in the silver."

Ann said...

PS- the quilt in the pix is from this web site:
http://home.apu.edu/~raabigail/View%20my%20quilts.htm