Thursday, March 20, 2014

Crosses of St. Catherine of Alexandria

Our church uses a variety of crosses depending on the liturgical season. We are in the process of discussing moving a window with a nondescript design that was over the altar but too small for the space. During this time we have tried out different expressions of the cross. We also have other crosses around the church. I have been challenged and gone more deeply into the subject, especially as I design each expression.

The crosses of St. Catherine's speak to me in a variety of ways.

The stick cross (currently hanging in over the altar) reminds me of the fragility of life but how we are always bound together in the bonds of baptism. It is a cross for Lent with a burlap banner behind it. It is made of red osier dogwood sticks bound together with bare copper wire.

Most of the year we have a brass cross is a Celtic cross and carries me back to our roots in the British Isles. It is also sturdy and enduring as the love of Christ. It reflects the light back to us. We use banners of the year's liturgical colors with it. It was hanging in our church when we met in a converted school building (now a strip mall). So it also holds those memories of beginnings and dreams.

The driftwood cross (used last year in Lent and this year in the narthex) evokes the place we call home and the tides and storms and calm of the Pacific Ocean. It is made of 2 piece of driftwood and is attached to a base. This year we have a purple cloth around the base and burlap hanging behind it.

The St Catherine's cross (on top of the church) connects us to the early church, spreading to the 4 corners of the earth, and the spears remind us of the suffering of those who stood up for the faith. It is a copy of a cross on
top of the bell tower of the Monastery of Saint Catherine at Mount Sinai located in Egypt.

The processional cross with its icons of Jesus and the Gospels reminds me of John 5:39,that I need to study but that life in Christ is in the living. This cross was commissioned for us when we built our current building.

Each one says much more as I enter into contemplation on this sign that even death is not the end.


3 comments:

JCF said...

Really nice, Ann (I especially like that processional icon cross).

Tell me though: how do you translate "St Catherine's" into "Santa Catalina"? Shouldn't it be "Santa Catarina"?

Ann said...

Catherine in Spanish is usually Catalina. More here.

Grandmère Mimi said...

Lovely meditation, Ann. Thank you.